Sacred Chow Kosher Restaurant

 Kosher Restaurant in New York

Sacred Chow vegan kosher restaurant in New York is kosher certified by the International Kosher Council under the direction of Rabbi Zev Schwarcz.Sacred Chow Vegan Vegetarian Organic Kosher Restaurant New York

Thousands of years ago wise people created dietary laws (called kosher in English) that were meant to protect people and the planet.  Sacred Chow follows this tradition by consciously making food that is healthy for you and the world.

What does Kosher mean?

Orthodox Jewish observance includes the following of dietary laws that in English are called kosher.  Since Sacred Chow is 100% plant based, it is,  with rabbinical certification, kosher.

For those people interested in learning more about kosher, here is an edited version of the wikipedia kosher food post.  Much of it discusses meat and meat by products which is included here eveb though they are irrelevant at Sacred Chow since we are 100% plant based.

The Kosher Dietary Laws

Reasons for food not being kosher (treif) include the presence of ingredients derived from non-kosher animals or from kosher animals that were not slaughtered in a ritually proper manner.  Dairy and meat can not be mixed, wine, grape juice and their derivatives need to be produced under supervision,  and only kosher cooking utensils and machinery used.

Clean and unclean animals

Deuteronomy and Leviticus state that any animal which chews the cud and has a cloven hoof is ritually clean, but animals that only chew the cud or only have cloven hooves are not. The texts identify four animals in particular as being unclean for this reason; the hare, hyrax, camel, and pig — although the camel is a ruminant and has two toes, and the hare and hyrax are hind gut fermenters rather than ruminants.

 Winged creatures which may not be consumed, mainly birds of prey, fish-eating water-birds, and bats.   Anything residing in “the waters” (seas and rivers) is ritually clean only if it has both fins and scales .  No shellfish, lobster, shrimp.  Every creeping thing that crawls the earth is unclean.  However, a bug born inside a fruit may be eaten if it has never crawled on the ground.  All “flying creeping things” are also considered ritually unclean with four exceptions: two types of locust, the beetle/cricket, and the grasshopper.

Animal products

In addition to meat, all other produce of ritually unclean animals, as well as from unhealthy animals, were banned. This included eggs (including fish roe) and milk as well as derived products such as cheese and jelly, but did not include materials merely “manufactured” or “gathered” by animals, such as honey.  According to the rabbinical writers, eggs from ritually pure animals would always be prolate (“pointy”) at one end and oblate (“rounded”) at the other, helping to reduce uncertainty about whether consumption was permitted or not.

Blood

One of the main biblical food laws forbids eating blood on account of “the life [being] in the blood”.  The Priestly Code also prohibits the eating of certain types of fat (chelev) from sacrificial land animals (cattle, sheep, and goats), since the fat is the portion of the meat exclusively allocated to God (by burning it on the altar)

The classical rabbis argued that, in a number of cases, only if it is impossible to remove every drop of blood, the prohibition against consuming blood was impractical, and there should be rare exceptions: they claimed that consuming the blood that remained on the inside of meat (as opposed to the blood on the surface of it, dripping from it, or housed within the veins) should be permitted and that the blood of fish and locusts could also be consumed

To comply with this prohibition, a number of preparation techniques became practiced within traditional Judaism. The main technique, known as melihah, involves the meat being soaked in water for about half an hour, which opens pores.  After this, the meat is placed on a slanted board or in a wicker basket, and is thickly covered with salt on each side, then left for between 20 minutes and one hour. The salt covering draws blood from the meat by osmosis, and the salt must be subsequently removed from the meat (usually by trying to shake most of it off and then washing the meat twice) to complete the extraction of the blood. The type of salt used in the process is known as kosher salt.

Melihah is not sufficient to extract blood from the liver, lungs, heart, and certain other internal organs, since they naturally contain a high density of blood, and therefore these organs are usually removed before the rest of the meat is salted. Roasting, on the other hand, discharges blood while cooking, and is the usual treatment given to these organs. It is also an acceptable method for removing blood from all meat.

Ritual slaughter

Of the rules appearing, in two groups, in Exodus, most do not express dietary laws, but one of the few dietary rules it does list is a ban on eating the meat from animals which have been “torn by beasts” or that have died from natural causes, and even giving away or selling such things. 

Traditional Jewish thought has expressed the view that all meat must come from animals which have been slaughtered according to Jewish law. These strict guidelines require the animal be killed by a single cut across the throat to a precise depth, severing both carotid arteries, both jugular veins, both vagus nerves, the trachea and the esophagus, no higher than the epiglottis and no lower than where cilia begin inside the trachea, causing the animal to bleed to death. Orthodox Jews argue that this ensures the animal dies instantly without unnecessary suffering, but many animal rights activists view the process as cruel, arguing that the animal may not lose consciousness immediately, and activists have called for it to be banned.

To avoid tearing, and to ensure the cut is thorough, such slaughter is usually performed by a trained individual, with a large, razor-sharp knife, which is checked before each killing to ensure that it has no irregularities (such as nicks and dents); if irregularities are discovered, or the cut is too shallow, the meat is deemed not kosher. Rabbis usually require the slaughterer, known within Judaism as a shochet, to also be a pious Jew of good character and an observer of the Shabbat. In smaller communities, the shochet was often the town rabbi, or a rabbi from a local synagogue, but large slaughterhouses usually employ a full-time shochet if they intend to sell kosher meat.

The Talmud also prohibits the consumption of meat from animals who were slaughtered despite being in the process of dying from disease; but this is not based on concern for the health of the eater, instead being an extension of the rules banning the meat from animals torn by beasts, and animals which die from natural causes.

To comply with this Talmudic injunction against eating diseased animals, Orthodox Jews usually require that the corpses of freshly slaughtered animals are thoroughly inspected. There are 70 different traditional checks for irregularities and growths; for example, there are checks to ensure that the lungs have absolutely no scars, which might have been caused by an inflammation. If these checks are passed, the meat is then termed glatt (גלאַט), the Yiddish word meaningsmooth.

Compromises in countries with animal cruelty laws that prohibit such practices involve stunning the animal to lessen the suffering that occurs while the animal bleeds to death. However, the use of electric shocks to daze the animal is often not accepted by some markets as producing meat which is kosher.

Tainted food

For obvious reasons, the Talmud adds to the biblical regulations a prohibition against consuming poisoned animals.  Similarly, the Yoreh De’ah prohibits the drinking of water, if the water had been left overnight and uncovered in an area where there might be serpents, on the basis that a serpent might have left its venom in the water. In a place where there is no suspicion of snakes, this prohibition does not apply.

Milk and Meat

Three times the Torah specifically forbids “seething” a young goat “in its mother’s milk” (Exodus 23:19, Exodus 34:26, and Deuteronomy 14:21). The Talmud interprets this as a general prohibition against cooking meat and dairy products together, and against eating or deriving any benefit from such a mixture. To help prevent accidental violation of these rules, the modern standard Orthodox practice is to classify food into either being meat, dairy, or neither; this third category is more usually referred to as parev from the Yiddish word meaning “neutral”.

One of the major kosher dietary laws that observant Jews keep is that dairy and meat may not be eaten at the same meal. Though it is mentioned many times in the Old Testament, Rashi held that it was connected to two major ethical laws in the Jewish heritage from the original Five Books of Moses, which are first: to respect the mother animal, Exodus 23:19 “You shall not boil a kid in its mother’s milk” (C.F. to above law about mother birds, Deuteronomy 22:6, “If you come across a bird’s nest beside the road, either in a tree or on the ground, and the mother is sitting on the young or on the eggs, do not take the mother with the young.”).

Zagat Rated Vegan, Vegetarian, Organic, Kosher Restaurant in New York —-100% Plant based food.